Read: Philippians 1:12-18

When Charles Finney was 29 years old, he was concerned about his soul’s salvation. On October 10, 1821, he withdrew to a wooden area near his home for a time of prayer. As he spent his time there, he had a deep conversion experience. He wrote later: “The Holy Spirit … seemed to go through me, body and soul … Indeed it seemed to come in waves of liquid love.”

The next day, a client came to see him for legal advice. Finney told him: “I have a retainer from the Lord Jesus Christ to plead His cause and cannot plead yours.” He left his legal practice and entered into ministry. Eventually, God would use him mightily to bring others to Christ. The apostle Paul was also called to plead the Lord’s cause. He wrote in Phil. 1:17, “I am appointed for the defence of the gospel.” The word defence was used in the ancient world for an attorney pleading his case in a court of law. All believers in the Lord are called to share the wonderful news of the saving grace of God. Paul again says, “Now then, we are ambassadors for Christ, as though God were pleading through us: we implore you on Christ’s behalf, be reconciled to God” (2 Cor. 5:20).

Always be aware of the fact that it is a great privilege to be used of God to bring others to Christ. Do not go back on your responsibility before the Lord. Charles Spurgeon said regarding the desire of seeing someone else getting saved, “Have you no wish for others to be saved? Then you’re not saved yourself, be sure of that!” The good news of Jesus Christ is too good to keep to yourself. Will you plead the Lord’s cause more diligently?

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